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ARDROSSAN: THE LAST GREAT ESTATE ON THE PHILADELPHIA MAIN LINE

David Nelson Wren
Wednesday, May 2nd, 3:00PM
Event address: 
10720 Preston Road
Ste 1009B
Dallas, TX 75230
Ardrossan: The Last Great Estate on the Philadelphia Main Line Cover Image
By David Nelson Wren, Tom Crane (Photographer), Steve Gunther (Photographer)
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ISBN: 9780983863250
Availability: Hard to Find
Published: Bauer and Dean Publishers - October 20th, 2017

An intimate portrait that captures the elegant lifestyle of the Montgomerys and the majesty of their beloved home and estate

A richly detailed history of the baronial splendor of the Philadelphia Main Line estate, Ardrossan, and of the Montgomery family who built it. Real-life American counterparts of the Granthams of Downton Abbey, the Montgomerys are best known as the family on which Philip Barry based his 1939 play, The Philadelphia Story, featuring Katharine Hepburn, who also starred in the later Hollywood film of the same name. The Montgomerys entertained in the grand manner, hosting fox hunts and dinner dances. Guests included diplomat W. Averell Harriman; first lady Edith Roosevelt, Mrs. Montgomery’s cousin; and famed vaudevillians the Duncan Sisters. At its height, the magnificent estate encompassed roughly 760 acres of rolling Pennsylvania hills. The Montgomerys’ home, still owned by the family, stands as a glorious reminder of the halcyon days of the Gilded Age.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR
David Nelson Wren is an independent scholar who focuses mainly on history and art. In the late 1980s, Wren, a native of Dallas, Texas, relocated to Philadelphia, where his love affair with Ardrossan began. He currently divides his time between Philadelphia and Trumansburg, New York, where he and his husband own Halsey House, a landmark Greek Revival farmhouse that is one of the top-ranking inns in the Finger Lakes region. Wren writes a twice-monthly column for the Ithaca Journal and is a longtime member of several of Philadelphia’s more venerable institutions, including the Athenaeum of Philadelphia and the Franklin Inn Club.