BFI BOOK CLUB 2024

 

Founded in May 2023, the BFI Book Club reads selections from the BFI Film Classics series. The BFI Film Classics series from the British Film Institute brings in scholars and journalists to write books that introduce, interpret and celebrate landmarks of world cinema. Each volume offers an argument for the film's 'classic' status, together with discussion of its production and reception history, its place within a genre or national cinema, an account of its technical and aesthetic importance, and in many cases, the author's personal response to the film.

On the second Monday of every month, our Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Parry, will lead an in-person meeting centered around a selection from the BFI Film Classics series. Join us to share your opinions on the film, the author's interpretations, and develop a better understanding of some of your new favorite films! Everyone is welcome!
 

PAST BFI BOOK CLUB SELECTIONS
 


            

Tokyo Story (BFI Film Classics)

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By Alastair Phillips

Tokyo Story (BFI Film Classics) By Alastair Phillips Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781911239239
Availability: NOT IN STOCK - Usually arrives in 7 - 14 business days
Published: British Film Institute - November 3rd, 2022

Event: Monday, August 12, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of Tokyo Story at the Texas Theatre on Saturday, July 27th at 5:00!
Purchase tickets to Tokyo Story here.

This BFI Film Classics study of Tokyo Monogatari/Tokyo Story (1953) reveals the making, meaning and legacy behind Ozu Yasujiro's masterpiece.

Ozu's moving family drama is universally acknowledged as one of the most significant Japanese films ever made. In its complex portrait of human motivation and lively sense of social space, it offers a profound and poignant insight into the generational shifts of post-war Japan.

Alastair Phillips provides an in-depth analysis of the film and its key locations - the city of Tokyo, the town of Onomichi and the coastal resort of Atami - with a discussion of its representation of Japanese society at a time of great cultural change. Drawing upon Japanese and English language sources, he situates the film within various contemporary critical and industrial contexts and examines the multiple international dimensions of Tokyo Story's long after-life to understand its enormous contribution to global film culture.

About the Author


Alastair Phillips is Professor of Film Studies at the University of Warwick, UK. He is the co-editor (with Hideaki Fujiki) of The Japanese Cinema Book (BFI, 2020) and Japanese Cinema: Texts and Contexts (2007) (with Julian Stringer). He is an editor of Screen.


Tokyo Story (BFI Film Classics) By Alastair Phillips Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781911239239
Availability: NOT IN STOCK - Usually arrives in 7 - 14 business days
Published: British Film Institute - November 3rd, 2022

Event: Monday, August 12, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of Tokyo Story at the Texas Theatre on Saturday, July 27th at 5:00!
Purchase tickets to Tokyo Story here.

This BFI Film Classics study of Tokyo Monogatari/Tokyo Story (1953) reveals the making, meaning and legacy behind Ozu Yasujiro's masterpiece.

Ozu's moving family drama is universally acknowledged as one of the most significant Japanese films ever made. In its complex portrait of human motivation and lively sense of social space, it offers a profound and poignant insight into the generational shifts of post-war Japan.

Alastair Phillips provides an in-depth analysis of the film and its key locations - the city of Tokyo, the town of Onomichi and the coastal resort of Atami - with a discussion of its representation of Japanese society at a time of great cultural change. Drawing upon Japanese and English language sources, he situates the film within various contemporary critical and industrial contexts and examines the multiple international dimensions of Tokyo Story's long after-life to understand its enormous contribution to global film culture.

About the Author


Alastair Phillips is Professor of Film Studies at the University of Warwick, UK. He is the co-editor (with Hideaki Fujiki) of The Japanese Cinema Book (BFI, 2020) and Japanese Cinema: Texts and Contexts (2007) (with Julian Stringer). He is an editor of Screen.


Event: Monday, August 12, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of Tokyo Story at the Texas Theatre on Saturday, July 27th at 5:00!
Purchase tickets to Tokyo Story here.

This BFI Film Classics study of Tokyo Monogatari/Tokyo Story (1953) reveals the making, meaning and legacy behind Ozu Yasujiro's masterpiece.

Ozu's moving family drama is universally acknowledged as one of the most significant Japanese films ever made. In its complex portrait of human motivation and lively sense of social space, it offers a profound and poignant insight into the generational shifts of post-war Japan.

Alastair Phillips provides an in-depth analysis of the film and its key locations - the city of Tokyo, the town of Onomichi and the coastal resort of Atami - with a discussion of its representation of Japanese society at a time of great cultural change. Drawing upon Japanese and English language sources, he situates the film within various contemporary critical and industrial contexts and examines the multiple international dimensions of Tokyo Story's long after-life to understand its enormous contribution to global film culture.

About the Author


Alastair Phillips is Professor of Film Studies at the University of Warwick, UK. He is the co-editor (with Hideaki Fujiki) of The Japanese Cinema Book (BFI, 2020) and Japanese Cinema: Texts and Contexts (2007) (with Julian Stringer). He is an editor of Screen.

            

Don't Look Now (BFI Film Classics)

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By Mark Sanderson

Don't Look Now (BFI Film Classics) By Mark Sanderson Cover Image
Currently Unavailable
ISBN: 9781844575152
Availability: Out of Print
Published: British Film Institute - September 4th, 2012

Event: Monday, September 9, 2024 6PM

 

This is a backlisted title. To purchase the book, please call (214) 484-4289.

Don't Look Now, released in 1973, confirmed director Nicolas Roeg as one of the most stylish and innovative British directors of the postwar period. This new edition of Sanderson's study is published in the Film Classics 20th anniversary series of special editions, with a new foreword by Jason Wood and a stunning new jacket design.

About the Author


MARK SANDERSON started his journalistic career reviewing films for TimeOut. He is now a literary critic for the London Evening Standard and the SundayTelegraph. He is the author of several books: Wrong Rooms (2002), a memoir, andthe novels Snow Hill (2010) and The Whispering Gallery (2011)

 

This is a backlisted title. To purchase the book, please call (214) 484-4289.

 


Don't Look Now (BFI Film Classics) By Mark Sanderson Cover Image
Currently Unavailable
ISBN: 9781844575152
Availability: Out of Print
Published: British Film Institute - September 4th, 2012

Event: Monday, September 9, 2024 6PM

 

This is a backlisted title. To purchase the book, please call (214) 484-4289.

Don't Look Now, released in 1973, confirmed director Nicolas Roeg as one of the most stylish and innovative British directors of the postwar period. This new edition of Sanderson's study is published in the Film Classics 20th anniversary series of special editions, with a new foreword by Jason Wood and a stunning new jacket design.

About the Author


MARK SANDERSON started his journalistic career reviewing films for TimeOut. He is now a literary critic for the London Evening Standard and the SundayTelegraph. He is the author of several books: Wrong Rooms (2002), a memoir, andthe novels Snow Hill (2010) and The Whispering Gallery (2011)

 

This is a backlisted title. To purchase the book, please call (214) 484-4289.

 


Event: Monday, September 9, 2024 6PM

 

This is a backlisted title. To purchase the book, please call (214) 484-4289.

Don't Look Now, released in 1973, confirmed director Nicolas Roeg as one of the most stylish and innovative British directors of the postwar period. This new edition of Sanderson's study is published in the Film Classics 20th anniversary series of special editions, with a new foreword by Jason Wood and a stunning new jacket design.

About the Author


MARK SANDERSON started his journalistic career reviewing films for TimeOut. He is now a literary critic for the London Evening Standard and the SundayTelegraph. He is the author of several books: Wrong Rooms (2002), a memoir, andthe novels Snow Hill (2010) and The Whispering Gallery (2011)

 

This is a backlisted title. To purchase the book, please call (214) 484-4289.

 

            

Spirited Away (BFI Film Classics)

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By Andrew Osmond

Spirited Away (BFI Film Classics) By Andrew Osmond Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781838719524
Availability: NOT IN STOCK - Usually arrives in 7 - 14 business days
Published: British Film Institute - May 28th, 2020

Event: Monday, January 8, 2024 6PM

 

Spirited Away, directed by the veteran anime film-maker Hayao Miyazaki, is Japan's most successful film, and one of the top-grossing 'foreign language' films ever released. Set in modern Japan, the film is a wildly imaginative fantasy, at once personal and universal. It tells the story of a listless little girl, Chihiro, who stumbles into a magical world where gods relax in a palatial bathhouse, where there are giant babies and hard-working soot sprites, and where a train runs across the sea.

Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan. Osmond unpacks the film's visual language, which many Western (and some Japanese) audiences find both beautiful and bewildering. He traces connections between Spirited Away and Miyazaki's prior body of work, arguing that Spirited Away uses the cartoon medium to create a compellingly immersive drawn world. This edition includes a new foreword by the author in which he considers the world of animated cinema post-Spirited Away, considering its influence on films ranging from del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth to Pixar's Inside Out.

 

About the Author


Andrew Osmond is a journalist and critic based in Berkshire, UK. He is the author of Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist (2009); 100 Animated Feature Films (BFI Publishing, 2010) and Ghost in the Shell (2017).
 


Spirited Away (BFI Film Classics) By Andrew Osmond Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781838719524
Availability: NOT IN STOCK - Usually arrives in 7 - 14 business days
Published: British Film Institute - May 28th, 2020

Event: Monday, January 8, 2024 6PM

 

Spirited Away, directed by the veteran anime film-maker Hayao Miyazaki, is Japan's most successful film, and one of the top-grossing 'foreign language' films ever released. Set in modern Japan, the film is a wildly imaginative fantasy, at once personal and universal. It tells the story of a listless little girl, Chihiro, who stumbles into a magical world where gods relax in a palatial bathhouse, where there are giant babies and hard-working soot sprites, and where a train runs across the sea.

Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan. Osmond unpacks the film's visual language, which many Western (and some Japanese) audiences find both beautiful and bewildering. He traces connections between Spirited Away and Miyazaki's prior body of work, arguing that Spirited Away uses the cartoon medium to create a compellingly immersive drawn world. This edition includes a new foreword by the author in which he considers the world of animated cinema post-Spirited Away, considering its influence on films ranging from del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth to Pixar's Inside Out.

 

About the Author


Andrew Osmond is a journalist and critic based in Berkshire, UK. He is the author of Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist (2009); 100 Animated Feature Films (BFI Publishing, 2010) and Ghost in the Shell (2017).
 


Event: Monday, January 8, 2024 6PM

 

Spirited Away, directed by the veteran anime film-maker Hayao Miyazaki, is Japan's most successful film, and one of the top-grossing 'foreign language' films ever released. Set in modern Japan, the film is a wildly imaginative fantasy, at once personal and universal. It tells the story of a listless little girl, Chihiro, who stumbles into a magical world where gods relax in a palatial bathhouse, where there are giant babies and hard-working soot sprites, and where a train runs across the sea.

Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan. Osmond unpacks the film's visual language, which many Western (and some Japanese) audiences find both beautiful and bewildering. He traces connections between Spirited Away and Miyazaki's prior body of work, arguing that Spirited Away uses the cartoon medium to create a compellingly immersive drawn world. This edition includes a new foreword by the author in which he considers the world of animated cinema post-Spirited Away, considering its influence on films ranging from del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth to Pixar's Inside Out.

 

About the Author


Andrew Osmond is a journalist and critic based in Berkshire, UK. He is the author of Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist (2009); 100 Animated Feature Films (BFI Publishing, 2010) and Ghost in the Shell (2017).
 

            

The Red Shoes (BFI Film Classics)

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By Pamela Hutchinson

The Red Shoes (BFI Film Classics) By Pamela Hutchinson Cover Image
$17.95
ISBN: 9781839026065
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: British Film Institute - October 5th, 2023

Event: Monday, February 19, 2024 6PM

 

Join us for a screening of The Red Shoes at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, January 28th at 4:00!
Buy tickets to The Red Shoes now.

Endlessly fascinating, dark and bright, The Red Shoes (1948) employs every branch of the cinematic arts to sweep the audience off its feet, invigorated by the transcendence of art itself, only to leave them with troubling questions. Representing the climax of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's celebrated run of six exceptional feature films, the film remains a beloved, if unsettling and often divisive, classic.

 

Pamela Hutchinson's study of the film examines its breathtaking use of Technicolor, music, choreography, editing and art direction at the zenith of Powell and Pressburger's capacity for 'composed cinema'. Through a close reading of key scenes, particularly the film's famous extended ballet sequence, she considers the unconventional use of ballet as uncanny spectacle and the feminist implications of the central story of female sacrifice.

 

Hutchinson goes on to consider the film's lasting and wide-reaching influence, tracing its impact on the film musical genre and horror cinema, with filmmakers such as Joanna Hogg, Sally Potter, Martin Scorsese and Brian De Palma having cited the film as an inspiration.

 

About the Author


Pamela Hutchinson is a writer, critic, film historian and curator based in the UK. Her previous publications include Pandora's Box (British Film Institute, 2020) and 30-Second Cinema (2019). She writes on early and silent film for Sight and Sound (including a monthly column), Criterion, Indicator, the Guardian, the Independent, the Financial Times, Empire and Little White Lies.


The Red Shoes (BFI Film Classics) By Pamela Hutchinson Cover Image
$17.95
ISBN: 9781839026065
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: British Film Institute - October 5th, 2023

Event: Monday, February 19, 2024 6PM

 

Join us for a screening of The Red Shoes at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, January 28th at 4:00!
Buy tickets to The Red Shoes now.

Endlessly fascinating, dark and bright, The Red Shoes (1948) employs every branch of the cinematic arts to sweep the audience off its feet, invigorated by the transcendence of art itself, only to leave them with troubling questions. Representing the climax of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's celebrated run of six exceptional feature films, the film remains a beloved, if unsettling and often divisive, classic.

 

Pamela Hutchinson's study of the film examines its breathtaking use of Technicolor, music, choreography, editing and art direction at the zenith of Powell and Pressburger's capacity for 'composed cinema'. Through a close reading of key scenes, particularly the film's famous extended ballet sequence, she considers the unconventional use of ballet as uncanny spectacle and the feminist implications of the central story of female sacrifice.

 

Hutchinson goes on to consider the film's lasting and wide-reaching influence, tracing its impact on the film musical genre and horror cinema, with filmmakers such as Joanna Hogg, Sally Potter, Martin Scorsese and Brian De Palma having cited the film as an inspiration.

 

About the Author


Pamela Hutchinson is a writer, critic, film historian and curator based in the UK. Her previous publications include Pandora's Box (British Film Institute, 2020) and 30-Second Cinema (2019). She writes on early and silent film for Sight and Sound (including a monthly column), Criterion, Indicator, the Guardian, the Independent, the Financial Times, Empire and Little White Lies.


Event: Monday, February 19, 2024 6PM

 

Join us for a screening of The Red Shoes at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, January 28th at 4:00!
Buy tickets to The Red Shoes now.

Endlessly fascinating, dark and bright, The Red Shoes (1948) employs every branch of the cinematic arts to sweep the audience off its feet, invigorated by the transcendence of art itself, only to leave them with troubling questions. Representing the climax of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's celebrated run of six exceptional feature films, the film remains a beloved, if unsettling and often divisive, classic.

 

Pamela Hutchinson's study of the film examines its breathtaking use of Technicolor, music, choreography, editing and art direction at the zenith of Powell and Pressburger's capacity for 'composed cinema'. Through a close reading of key scenes, particularly the film's famous extended ballet sequence, she considers the unconventional use of ballet as uncanny spectacle and the feminist implications of the central story of female sacrifice.

 

Hutchinson goes on to consider the film's lasting and wide-reaching influence, tracing its impact on the film musical genre and horror cinema, with filmmakers such as Joanna Hogg, Sally Potter, Martin Scorsese and Brian De Palma having cited the film as an inspiration.

 

About the Author


Pamela Hutchinson is a writer, critic, film historian and curator based in the UK. Her previous publications include Pandora's Box (British Film Institute, 2020) and 30-Second Cinema (2019). She writes on early and silent film for Sight and Sound (including a monthly column), Criterion, Indicator, the Guardian, the Independent, the Financial Times, Empire and Little White Lies.

            

Rushmore (BFI Film Classics)

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By Kristi Irene McKim

Rushmore (BFI Film Classics) By Kristi Irene McKim Cover Image
$17.95
ISBN: 9781839024498
Availability: NOT IN STOCK - Usually arrives in 7 - 14 business days
Published: British Film Institute - October 5th, 2023

Event: Monday, March 11, 2024 6PM

 

Join us for a screening of Rushmore at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, February 25th at 4:30!
Buy tickets to Rushmore now.

Earning critical acclaim and commercial success upon its 1998 release, Rushmore-the sophomore film of American auteur Wes Anderson-quickly gained the status of a cult classic. A melancholic coming-of-age story wrapped in comedy drama, Rushmore focuses on the efforts of Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman)-a brazen and precocious fifteen-year-old-to find his way. Restless, energetic, struggling, and overcompensating for his insecurities, Max pursues a dizzying range of possible futures, leading him into the orbit of local steel magnate Herman Blume (Bill Murray), elementary school teacher Rosemary Cross (Olivia Williams), and a host of cooperative schoolmates who help him to stage lavish film-derivative plays.

Kristi McKim's compelling study of the film argues that despite the film's titular call for haste and excess (rush/more), it challenges a drive toward perfectionism and celebrates the quiet connections that defy such passion and speed. After establishing Rushmore's history and reception, McKim closely reads Rushmore's energetic musical montages relative to slower moments that introduce tenderness and ambiguity, in a form subtler than Max's desire-built drive or genre-based plays. Her analysis offers an urgent corrective to what might be perceived as an endearing portrait of privilege that perpetuates a status quo power. Drawing out Rushmore's subtleties that soften, temper, ease, expand, and equalize the film's zeal, she reads the film with a generosity learned from the film itself.

 

About the Author


Kristi Irene McKim is Professor and Chair of Film and Media Studies and English at Hendrix College, USA. Her books include Love in the Time of Cinema (2011) and Cinema as Weather: Stylistic Screens and Atmospheric Change (2013). She has published in journals such as Camera Obscura, Studies in French Cinema, Senses of Cinema, Bennington Review, New England Review, Bright Lights Film Review, Film International, and Film-Philosophy. She is also the online editor for Film Matters Magazine and co-editor of The Cine-Files special edition on "Teaching Film".


Rushmore (BFI Film Classics) By Kristi Irene McKim Cover Image
$17.95
ISBN: 9781839024498
Availability: NOT IN STOCK - Usually arrives in 7 - 14 business days
Published: British Film Institute - October 5th, 2023

Event: Monday, March 11, 2024 6PM

 

Join us for a screening of Rushmore at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, February 25th at 4:30!
Buy tickets to Rushmore now.

Earning critical acclaim and commercial success upon its 1998 release, Rushmore-the sophomore film of American auteur Wes Anderson-quickly gained the status of a cult classic. A melancholic coming-of-age story wrapped in comedy drama, Rushmore focuses on the efforts of Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman)-a brazen and precocious fifteen-year-old-to find his way. Restless, energetic, struggling, and overcompensating for his insecurities, Max pursues a dizzying range of possible futures, leading him into the orbit of local steel magnate Herman Blume (Bill Murray), elementary school teacher Rosemary Cross (Olivia Williams), and a host of cooperative schoolmates who help him to stage lavish film-derivative plays.

Kristi McKim's compelling study of the film argues that despite the film's titular call for haste and excess (rush/more), it challenges a drive toward perfectionism and celebrates the quiet connections that defy such passion and speed. After establishing Rushmore's history and reception, McKim closely reads Rushmore's energetic musical montages relative to slower moments that introduce tenderness and ambiguity, in a form subtler than Max's desire-built drive or genre-based plays. Her analysis offers an urgent corrective to what might be perceived as an endearing portrait of privilege that perpetuates a status quo power. Drawing out Rushmore's subtleties that soften, temper, ease, expand, and equalize the film's zeal, she reads the film with a generosity learned from the film itself.

 

About the Author


Kristi Irene McKim is Professor and Chair of Film and Media Studies and English at Hendrix College, USA. Her books include Love in the Time of Cinema (2011) and Cinema as Weather: Stylistic Screens and Atmospheric Change (2013). She has published in journals such as Camera Obscura, Studies in French Cinema, Senses of Cinema, Bennington Review, New England Review, Bright Lights Film Review, Film International, and Film-Philosophy. She is also the online editor for Film Matters Magazine and co-editor of The Cine-Files special edition on "Teaching Film".


Event: Monday, March 11, 2024 6PM

 

Join us for a screening of Rushmore at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, February 25th at 4:30!
Buy tickets to Rushmore now.

Earning critical acclaim and commercial success upon its 1998 release, Rushmore-the sophomore film of American auteur Wes Anderson-quickly gained the status of a cult classic. A melancholic coming-of-age story wrapped in comedy drama, Rushmore focuses on the efforts of Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman)-a brazen and precocious fifteen-year-old-to find his way. Restless, energetic, struggling, and overcompensating for his insecurities, Max pursues a dizzying range of possible futures, leading him into the orbit of local steel magnate Herman Blume (Bill Murray), elementary school teacher Rosemary Cross (Olivia Williams), and a host of cooperative schoolmates who help him to stage lavish film-derivative plays.

Kristi McKim's compelling study of the film argues that despite the film's titular call for haste and excess (rush/more), it challenges a drive toward perfectionism and celebrates the quiet connections that defy such passion and speed. After establishing Rushmore's history and reception, McKim closely reads Rushmore's energetic musical montages relative to slower moments that introduce tenderness and ambiguity, in a form subtler than Max's desire-built drive or genre-based plays. Her analysis offers an urgent corrective to what might be perceived as an endearing portrait of privilege that perpetuates a status quo power. Drawing out Rushmore's subtleties that soften, temper, ease, expand, and equalize the film's zeal, she reads the film with a generosity learned from the film itself.

 

About the Author


Kristi Irene McKim is Professor and Chair of Film and Media Studies and English at Hendrix College, USA. Her books include Love in the Time of Cinema (2011) and Cinema as Weather: Stylistic Screens and Atmospheric Change (2013). She has published in journals such as Camera Obscura, Studies in French Cinema, Senses of Cinema, Bennington Review, New England Review, Bright Lights Film Review, Film International, and Film-Philosophy. She is also the online editor for Film Matters Magazine and co-editor of The Cine-Files special edition on "Teaching Film".

            

Sunset Boulevard (BFI Film Classics)

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By Steven Cohan

Sunset Boulevard (BFI Film Classics) By Steven Cohan Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781839024085
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: British Film Institute - October 6th, 2022

Event: Monday, April 8, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of Sunset Boulevard at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, March 17th at 3:00!
Buy tickets to Sunset Boulevard now.

Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard was a critical and commercial success on its release in 1950 and remains a classic of film noir and one of the best-known Hollywood films about Hollywood. Both its opening, with William Holden as the screenwriter Joe Gillis floating facedown in ageing star Norma Desmond's (Gloria Swanson) pool, and lines such as 'I am big, it's the pictures that got small' are some of the most memorable in Classical Hollywood cinema.

Steven Cohan's study of the film draws on original archival research to shed new light on the film's production history, and the contribution to the film's success and meanings of director Wilder, stars Holden and Swanson but also supporting actors Erich von Stroheim, Nancy Olson (who plays Betty Schaefer), Cecil B. DeMille, and Hedda Hopper, as well as costumier Edith Head, and composer Franz Waxman. Cohan considers the film both as a 'backstudio' picture (a movie about Hollywood) and as a film noir, and in the context of McCarthyism, blacklisting and the Hollywood Ten.

Cohan explores how the film was marketed, its reception and afterlife, tracing how the film is at once a product of its own particular historical moment as the movie industry was transitioning out of the studio era, yet one that still speaks powerfully to contemporary audiences, and speculates on the reasons for its enduring appeal.

About the Author


Steven Cohan is Dean's Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Syracuse University, USA and President of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. His books include Telling Stories: A Theoretical Analysis of Narrative (1988, co-authored with Linda M. Shires), Masked Men: Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties (1997), Incongruous Entertainment: Camp, Cultural Value, and the MGM Musical (2005); a BFI TV Classic on CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2008); The Sound of Musicals (BFI 2010) and Hollywood by Hollywood: The Backstudio Picture and the Mystique of Making Movies (2018)


Sunset Boulevard (BFI Film Classics) By Steven Cohan Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781839024085
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: British Film Institute - October 6th, 2022

Event: Monday, April 8, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of Sunset Boulevard at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, March 17th at 3:00!
Buy tickets to Sunset Boulevard now.

Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard was a critical and commercial success on its release in 1950 and remains a classic of film noir and one of the best-known Hollywood films about Hollywood. Both its opening, with William Holden as the screenwriter Joe Gillis floating facedown in ageing star Norma Desmond's (Gloria Swanson) pool, and lines such as 'I am big, it's the pictures that got small' are some of the most memorable in Classical Hollywood cinema.

Steven Cohan's study of the film draws on original archival research to shed new light on the film's production history, and the contribution to the film's success and meanings of director Wilder, stars Holden and Swanson but also supporting actors Erich von Stroheim, Nancy Olson (who plays Betty Schaefer), Cecil B. DeMille, and Hedda Hopper, as well as costumier Edith Head, and composer Franz Waxman. Cohan considers the film both as a 'backstudio' picture (a movie about Hollywood) and as a film noir, and in the context of McCarthyism, blacklisting and the Hollywood Ten.

Cohan explores how the film was marketed, its reception and afterlife, tracing how the film is at once a product of its own particular historical moment as the movie industry was transitioning out of the studio era, yet one that still speaks powerfully to contemporary audiences, and speculates on the reasons for its enduring appeal.

About the Author


Steven Cohan is Dean's Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Syracuse University, USA and President of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. His books include Telling Stories: A Theoretical Analysis of Narrative (1988, co-authored with Linda M. Shires), Masked Men: Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties (1997), Incongruous Entertainment: Camp, Cultural Value, and the MGM Musical (2005); a BFI TV Classic on CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2008); The Sound of Musicals (BFI 2010) and Hollywood by Hollywood: The Backstudio Picture and the Mystique of Making Movies (2018)


Event: Monday, April 8, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of Sunset Boulevard at the Texas Theatre on Sunday, March 17th at 3:00!
Buy tickets to Sunset Boulevard now.

Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard was a critical and commercial success on its release in 1950 and remains a classic of film noir and one of the best-known Hollywood films about Hollywood. Both its opening, with William Holden as the screenwriter Joe Gillis floating facedown in ageing star Norma Desmond's (Gloria Swanson) pool, and lines such as 'I am big, it's the pictures that got small' are some of the most memorable in Classical Hollywood cinema.

Steven Cohan's study of the film draws on original archival research to shed new light on the film's production history, and the contribution to the film's success and meanings of director Wilder, stars Holden and Swanson but also supporting actors Erich von Stroheim, Nancy Olson (who plays Betty Schaefer), Cecil B. DeMille, and Hedda Hopper, as well as costumier Edith Head, and composer Franz Waxman. Cohan considers the film both as a 'backstudio' picture (a movie about Hollywood) and as a film noir, and in the context of McCarthyism, blacklisting and the Hollywood Ten.

Cohan explores how the film was marketed, its reception and afterlife, tracing how the film is at once a product of its own particular historical moment as the movie industry was transitioning out of the studio era, yet one that still speaks powerfully to contemporary audiences, and speculates on the reasons for its enduring appeal.

About the Author


Steven Cohan is Dean's Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Syracuse University, USA and President of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. His books include Telling Stories: A Theoretical Analysis of Narrative (1988, co-authored with Linda M. Shires), Masked Men: Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties (1997), Incongruous Entertainment: Camp, Cultural Value, and the MGM Musical (2005); a BFI TV Classic on CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2008); The Sound of Musicals (BFI 2010) and Hollywood by Hollywood: The Backstudio Picture and the Mystique of Making Movies (2018)


            

Mean Streets (BFI Film Classics)

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By Demetrios Matheou

Mean Streets (BFI Film Classics) By Demetrios Matheou Cover Image
$17.95
ISBN: 9781839022951
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: British Film Institute - October 5th, 2023

Event: Monday, May 13, 2024 6PM

 

 

Mean Streets screening at the Texas Theatre on Saturday, April 20th at 7:00!
Buy tickets to Mean Streets now.

 

Mean Streets was Martin Scorsese's third feature film, and the one that confirmed him as a major new talent. On its premiere at the New York Film Festival in 1973, the critic Pauline Kael hailed the film as 'a true original of our period, a triumph of personal film-making'. The tale of combative friends and small-time crooks is set amid the bars, pool halls, tenements and streets of Manhattan's Little Italy. Scorsese has said of his childhood neighbourhood, 'its very texture was interwoven with organised crime', and this quality would dramatically inform the tone and restless energy of his seminal film.

Demetrios Matheou's insightful study considers Mean Streets' production history in the context of the New Hollywood period of American cinema, noting also the key roles played by John Cassavetes and Roger Corman. He analyses the importance of Scorsese's background to the film's characters and themes, including preoccupations with guilt, redemption and criminal subcultures; the development of the director's film-making process and signature style; the way in which he both drew upon and invigorated the crime genre; his relationship with emerging stars Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel, and the film's reception and legacy.

Matheou argues that while Taxi Driver (1976) and Raging Bull (1980) are regarded as Scorsese's greatest films of the period, Mean Streets is the more influential achievement. With it, Scorsese not only paved the way for a new kind of crime movie, not least his own GoodFellas (1990), but also inspired generations of independently-minded film-makers.

About the Author


Demetrios Matheou is a London-based journalist and critic. His film writing has appeared in numerous publications, including The Guardian, The Times, Sight and Sound and Screen International. He was the Sunday Herald film critic from 2004-18 and is a regular contributor to The Arts Desk website. He is the author of The Faber Book of New South American Cinema (2010).


Mean Streets (BFI Film Classics) By Demetrios Matheou Cover Image
$17.95
ISBN: 9781839022951
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: British Film Institute - October 5th, 2023

Event: Monday, May 13, 2024 6PM

 

 

Mean Streets screening at the Texas Theatre on Saturday, April 20th at 7:00!
Buy tickets to Mean Streets now.

 

Mean Streets was Martin Scorsese's third feature film, and the one that confirmed him as a major new talent. On its premiere at the New York Film Festival in 1973, the critic Pauline Kael hailed the film as 'a true original of our period, a triumph of personal film-making'. The tale of combative friends and small-time crooks is set amid the bars, pool halls, tenements and streets of Manhattan's Little Italy. Scorsese has said of his childhood neighbourhood, 'its very texture was interwoven with organised crime', and this quality would dramatically inform the tone and restless energy of his seminal film.

Demetrios Matheou's insightful study considers Mean Streets' production history in the context of the New Hollywood period of American cinema, noting also the key roles played by John Cassavetes and Roger Corman. He analyses the importance of Scorsese's background to the film's characters and themes, including preoccupations with guilt, redemption and criminal subcultures; the development of the director's film-making process and signature style; the way in which he both drew upon and invigorated the crime genre; his relationship with emerging stars Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel, and the film's reception and legacy.

Matheou argues that while Taxi Driver (1976) and Raging Bull (1980) are regarded as Scorsese's greatest films of the period, Mean Streets is the more influential achievement. With it, Scorsese not only paved the way for a new kind of crime movie, not least his own GoodFellas (1990), but also inspired generations of independently-minded film-makers.

About the Author


Demetrios Matheou is a London-based journalist and critic. His film writing has appeared in numerous publications, including The Guardian, The Times, Sight and Sound and Screen International. He was the Sunday Herald film critic from 2004-18 and is a regular contributor to The Arts Desk website. He is the author of The Faber Book of New South American Cinema (2010).


Event: Monday, May 13, 2024 6PM

 

 

Mean Streets screening at the Texas Theatre on Saturday, April 20th at 7:00!
Buy tickets to Mean Streets now.

 

Mean Streets was Martin Scorsese's third feature film, and the one that confirmed him as a major new talent. On its premiere at the New York Film Festival in 1973, the critic Pauline Kael hailed the film as 'a true original of our period, a triumph of personal film-making'. The tale of combative friends and small-time crooks is set amid the bars, pool halls, tenements and streets of Manhattan's Little Italy. Scorsese has said of his childhood neighbourhood, 'its very texture was interwoven with organised crime', and this quality would dramatically inform the tone and restless energy of his seminal film.

Demetrios Matheou's insightful study considers Mean Streets' production history in the context of the New Hollywood period of American cinema, noting also the key roles played by John Cassavetes and Roger Corman. He analyses the importance of Scorsese's background to the film's characters and themes, including preoccupations with guilt, redemption and criminal subcultures; the development of the director's film-making process and signature style; the way in which he both drew upon and invigorated the crime genre; his relationship with emerging stars Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel, and the film's reception and legacy.

Matheou argues that while Taxi Driver (1976) and Raging Bull (1980) are regarded as Scorsese's greatest films of the period, Mean Streets is the more influential achievement. With it, Scorsese not only paved the way for a new kind of crime movie, not least his own GoodFellas (1990), but also inspired generations of independently-minded film-makers.

About the Author


Demetrios Matheou is a London-based journalist and critic. His film writing has appeared in numerous publications, including The Guardian, The Times, Sight and Sound and Screen International. He was the Sunday Herald film critic from 2004-18 and is a regular contributor to The Arts Desk website. He is the author of The Faber Book of New South American Cinema (2010).

            

The Matrix (BFI Film Classics)

ss

By Joshua Clover

The Matrix (BFI Film Classics) By Joshua Clover Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781839022678
Availability: NOT IN STOCK - Usually arrives in 7 - 14 business days
Published: British Film Institute - March 25th, 2021

Event: Monday, June 10, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of The Matrix at the Texas Theatre on Friday, May 17th at 8:00!
Presented by Cinéwilde
: Purchase tickets to The Matrix here.

The Matrix (1999), directed by the Wachowski sisters and produced by Joel Silver, was a true end-of-the-millennium movie, a statement of the American zeitgeist, and, as the original film in a blockbusting franchise, a prognosis for the future of big-budget Hollywood film-making.

Starring Keanu Reeves as Neo, a computer programmer transformed into a messianic freedom fighter, The Matrix blends science fiction with conspiracy thriller conventions and outlandish martial arts created with groundbreaking digital techniques. A box-office triumph, the film was no populist confection: its blatant allusions to highbrow contemporary philosophy added to its appeal as a mystery to be decoded.

In this compelling study, Joshua Clover undertakes the task of decoding the film. Examining The Matrix's digital effects and how they were achieved, he shows how the film represents a melding of cinema and video games (the greatest commercial threat to have faced Hollywood since the advent of television) and achieves a hybrid kind of immersive entertainment. He also unpacks the movie's references to philosophy, showing how The Matrix ultimately expresses the crisis American culture faced at the end of the 1990s.

About the Author


Joshua Clover is a writer and a Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California Davis, USA.His first book of poetry, Madonna anno domini, received the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets in 1996.


The Matrix (BFI Film Classics) By Joshua Clover Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781839022678
Availability: NOT IN STOCK - Usually arrives in 7 - 14 business days
Published: British Film Institute - March 25th, 2021

Event: Monday, June 10, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of The Matrix at the Texas Theatre on Friday, May 17th at 8:00!
Presented by Cinéwilde
: Purchase tickets to The Matrix here.

The Matrix (1999), directed by the Wachowski sisters and produced by Joel Silver, was a true end-of-the-millennium movie, a statement of the American zeitgeist, and, as the original film in a blockbusting franchise, a prognosis for the future of big-budget Hollywood film-making.

Starring Keanu Reeves as Neo, a computer programmer transformed into a messianic freedom fighter, The Matrix blends science fiction with conspiracy thriller conventions and outlandish martial arts created with groundbreaking digital techniques. A box-office triumph, the film was no populist confection: its blatant allusions to highbrow contemporary philosophy added to its appeal as a mystery to be decoded.

In this compelling study, Joshua Clover undertakes the task of decoding the film. Examining The Matrix's digital effects and how they were achieved, he shows how the film represents a melding of cinema and video games (the greatest commercial threat to have faced Hollywood since the advent of television) and achieves a hybrid kind of immersive entertainment. He also unpacks the movie's references to philosophy, showing how The Matrix ultimately expresses the crisis American culture faced at the end of the 1990s.

About the Author


Joshua Clover is a writer and a Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California Davis, USA.His first book of poetry, Madonna anno domini, received the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets in 1996.


Event: Monday, June 10, 2024 6PM
 

Join us for a screening of The Matrix at the Texas Theatre on Friday, May 17th at 8:00!
Presented by Cinéwilde
: Purchase tickets to The Matrix here.

The Matrix (1999), directed by the Wachowski sisters and produced by Joel Silver, was a true end-of-the-millennium movie, a statement of the American zeitgeist, and, as the original film in a blockbusting franchise, a prognosis for the future of big-budget Hollywood film-making.

Starring Keanu Reeves as Neo, a computer programmer transformed into a messianic freedom fighter, The Matrix blends science fiction with conspiracy thriller conventions and outlandish martial arts created with groundbreaking digital techniques. A box-office triumph, the film was no populist confection: its blatant allusions to highbrow contemporary philosophy added to its appeal as a mystery to be decoded.

In this compelling study, Joshua Clover undertakes the task of decoding the film. Examining The Matrix's digital effects and how they were achieved, he shows how the film represents a melding of cinema and video games (the greatest commercial threat to have faced Hollywood since the advent of television) and achieves a hybrid kind of immersive entertainment. He also unpacks the movie's references to philosophy, showing how The Matrix ultimately expresses the crisis American culture faced at the end of the 1990s.

About the Author


Joshua Clover is a writer and a Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California Davis, USA.His first book of poetry, Madonna anno domini, received the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets in 1996.

            

Meshes of the Afternoon (BFI Film Classics)

ss

By John David Rhodes

Meshes of the Afternoon (BFI Film Classics) By John David Rhodes Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781838719722
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: British Film Institute - May 28th, 2020

Event: Monday, July 8, 2024 6PM
 

Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), filmed by Maya Deren and her then husband Alexader Hammid in their bungalow above Sunset Boulevard for a mere $274.90, is the most important film in the history of American avant-garde cinema. The artistic collaboration between Deren and Hammid finds its distorted reflection in the vision of the film's tormented female protagonist. Its focus - through a series of intricate and interlocking dream sequences - on female experience and the domestic sphere links Meshes to the Hollywood melodramas of the period, while its unsettling atmosphere of dread, death and doubles makes it a counter-cinematic cousin to film noir. The film has influenced not only the subsequent history of experimental film, but also on the work of Hollywood auteurs. It is a touchstone of women's film-making, of modern cinema and of modern art.

John David Rhodes traces the film's history back into the lives of Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid, but in particular that of Deren. He reads the film as a culmination of Deren's abiding interest in modernism and her intense engagement in socialist politics. Rhodes argues that while the film remains a powerful point of reference for feminist film-makers and experimentalists, it is also an example of political art in the broadest terms.

In his foreword to this new edition, Rhodes reflects upon the film's continuing importance for and influence upon feminist and avant-garde filmmaking.


About the Author


John David Rhodes is Reader in Film Studies and Visual Culture at the University of Cambridge, UK. He is the author of Spectacle of Property: The House in American Film (2017) and Stupendous, Miserable City: Pasolini's Rome (2007) and the co-editor, with Brian Price, of On Michael Haneke (2010), with Laura Rascaroli, of Antonioni: Centenary Essays (BFI Publishing, 2011) and, with Elena Gorfinkel, of Taking Place: Location and the Moving Image (2011). He is also the founding co-editor of the journal World Picture.


Meshes of the Afternoon (BFI Film Classics) By John David Rhodes Cover Image
$15.95
ISBN: 9781838719722
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: British Film Institute - May 28th, 2020

Event: Monday, July 8, 2024 6PM
 

Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), filmed by Maya Deren and her then husband Alexader Hammid in their bungalow above Sunset Boulevard for a mere $274.90, is the most important film in the history of American avant-garde cinema. The artistic collaboration between Deren and Hammid finds its distorted reflection in the vision of the film's tormented female protagonist. Its focus - through a series of intricate and interlocking dream sequences - on female experience and the domestic sphere links Meshes to the Hollywood melodramas of the period, while its unsettling atmosphere of dread, death and doubles makes it a counter-cinematic cousin to film noir. The film has influenced not only the subsequent history of experimental film, but also on the work of Hollywood auteurs. It is a touchstone of women's film-making, of modern cinema and of modern art.

John David Rhodes traces the film's history back into the lives of Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid, but in particular that of Deren. He reads the film as a culmination of Deren's abiding interest in modernism and her intense engagement in socialist politics. Rhodes argues that while the film remains a powerful point of reference for feminist film-makers and experimentalists, it is also an example of political art in the broadest terms.

In his foreword to this new edition, Rhodes reflects upon the film's continuing importance for and influence upon feminist and avant-garde filmmaking.


About the Author


John David Rhodes is Reader in Film Studies and Visual Culture at the University of Cambridge, UK. He is the author of Spectacle of Property: The House in American Film (2017) and Stupendous, Miserable City: Pasolini's Rome (2007) and the co-editor, with Brian Price, of On Michael Haneke (2010), with Laura Rascaroli, of Antonioni: Centenary Essays (BFI Publishing, 2011) and, with Elena Gorfinkel, of Taking Place: Location and the Moving Image (2011). He is also the founding co-editor of the journal World Picture.


Event: Monday, July 8, 2024 6PM
 

Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), filmed by Maya Deren and her then husband Alexader Hammid in their bungalow above Sunset Boulevard for a mere $274.90, is the most important film in the history of American avant-garde cinema. The artistic collaboration between Deren and Hammid finds its distorted reflection in the vision of the film's tormented female protagonist. Its focus - through a series of intricate and interlocking dream sequences - on female experience and the domestic sphere links Meshes to the Hollywood melodramas of the period, while its unsettling atmosphere of dread, death and doubles makes it a counter-cinematic cousin to film noir. The film has influenced not only the subsequent history of experimental film, but also on the work of Hollywood auteurs. It is a touchstone of women's film-making, of modern cinema and of modern art.

John David Rhodes traces the film's history back into the lives of Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid, but in particular that of Deren. He reads the film as a culmination of Deren's abiding interest in modernism and her intense engagement in socialist politics. Rhodes argues that while the film remains a powerful point of reference for feminist film-makers and experimentalists, it is also an example of political art in the broadest terms.

In his foreword to this new edition, Rhodes reflects upon the film's continuing importance for and influence upon feminist and avant-garde filmmaking.


About the Author


John David Rhodes is Reader in Film Studies and Visual Culture at the University of Cambridge, UK. He is the author of Spectacle of Property: The House in American Film (2017) and Stupendous, Miserable City: Pasolini's Rome (2007) and the co-editor, with Brian Price, of On Michael Haneke (2010), with Laura Rascaroli, of Antonioni: Centenary Essays (BFI Publishing, 2011) and, with Elena Gorfinkel, of Taking Place: Location and the Moving Image (2011). He is also the founding co-editor of the journal World Picture.